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Chad Kelly Issues An Apology

Former St. Joe's star Chad Kelly, who was dismissed from the Clemson football team early this week, issued an apology today through his uncle, Dan Kelly:

"I have apologized to the coaching staff for my behavior," Kelly, the nephew of former Bills great Jim Kelly, said in the release. "I am disappointed in myself. I let down not only my coaches and teammates, but also Clemson University and all of our fans. Most importantly, I've let down myself and my family.

"I have always been competitive to a fault, winning at all costs. I let my emotions get the best of me, culminating in this unfortunate situation with Coach (Dabo) Swinney and the Clemson Tigers."

Swinney, the Clemson head coach, dismissed Kelly from the team on Monday, citing a "pattern" of behavior. Kelly had an on-field alteraction with his coaches last Saturday during the annual spring game. He was upset with the coaches for punting on fourth-and-three in the first half and was benched for the entire second half as a result.

According to South Carolina newspaper reports, Kelly didn't show remorse in a meeting with Swinney on Monday. The reports said Kelly also didn't apologize for an incident from last Thursday, when he was involved in a fender-bender that involved Ali Rogers, a former Miss South Carolina who works as in intern in the football offices. Rogers tweeted on Tuesday that Kelly had been disrespectful and tried to get her not to file a police report.

I spoke today with St. Joe's football coach Dennis Gilbert, who coached Kelly during his two years as a high school star in Buffalo. Gilbert attended Saturday's spring game with his two teen-aged sons and has been in contact with Kelly in recent days.

"I tell you, one of his best attributes is the fact that he's so competitive, " Gilbert said. "I think that's what gives him a big edge on the field of competition, that he's so competitive in everything he does. At times, that can get in your way, too."

"I have talked to him extensively," Gilbert said. "He's one of us, you know. Regardless of what happens, as a coach you've always got to be there for your kids and support them. It's easy to stand with them during the good times; you got to help them through the tough times, too.

"One of the first things Chad said to me after everything played out Monday was, ''Well, coach, we always said it's not the mistakes you make, it's how you answer them. We're in answering mode now.''"


Chad Kelly Issues An Apology

Former St. Joe's star Chad Kelly, who was dismissed from the Clemson football team early this week, issued an apology today through his uncle, Dan Kelly:

"I have apologized to the coaching staff for my behavior," Kelly said in the release. "I am disappointed in myself. I let down not only my coaches and teammates, but also Clemson University and all of our fans. Most importantly, I've let down myself and my family.

"I have always been competitive to a fault, winning at all costs. I let my emotions get the best of me, culminating in this unfortunate situation with Coach (Dabo) Swinney and the Clemson Tigers."

Swinney, the Clemson head coach, dismissed Kelly from the team on Monday, citing a "pattern" of behavior. Kelly had an on-field alteraction with his coaches last Saturday during the annual spring game. He was upset with the coaches for punting on fourth-and-three in the first half and was benched for the entire second half as a result.

According to South Carolina newspaper reports, Kelly didn't show remorse in a meeting with Swinney on Monday. The reports said Kelly also didn't apologize for an incident from last Thursday, when he was involved in a fender-bender that involved Ali Rogers, a former Miss South Carolina who works as in intern in the football offices. Rogers tweeted on Tuesday that Kelly had been disrespectful and tried to get her not to file a police report.

I spoke today with St. Joe's football coach Dennis Gilbert, who coached Kelly during his two years as a high school star in Buffalo. Gilbert attended Saturday's spring game with his two teen-aged sons and has been in contact with Kelly in recent days.

"I tell you, one of his best attributes is the fact that he's so competitive, " Gilbert said. "I think that's what gives him a big edge on the field of competition, that he's so competitive in everything he does. At times, that can get in your way, too."

"I have talked to him extensively," Gilbert said. "He's one of us, you know. Regardless of what happens, as a coach you've always got to be there for your kids and support them. It's easy to stand with them during the good times; you got to help them through the tough times, too.

"One of the first things Chad said to me after everything played out Monday was, ''Well, coach, we always said it's not the mistakes you make, it's how you answer them. We're in answering mode now.''"


Live chat at 1 p.m.: Sully on Sports

Live chat at 1 p.m.: Sully on Sports

Live chat at 1 p.m.: Sully on Sports

Marv on Ralph: "He wanted to show you he knew the game"

Marv Levy spoke with me this afternoon from Chicago about the passing of Bills owner Ralph Wilson. Here are the high points:

"I'm deeply saddened. I was out for a run-walk and got a call from another person with the sad news. It's upsetting ...

"First of all, he was a great guy to work for. That doesn't mean he wasn't demanding. He expected you to involve yourself heavily in your job. He would express his opinions, but he would listen back. Even if you disagreed with what you were saying, he would weigh it.

Bill Polian on Ralph Wilson

I spoke briefly with former Bills general manager Bill Polian this afternoon during a break from his TV duties about the passing of owner Ralph Wilson. Polian, who was fired by Wilson after the 1992 season and reconciled over the years, said Buffalo owes Ralph a debt of gratitude.

"Obviously, he brought the Bills to Buffalo," Polian said, "and during my time he had more than a few
opportunities to move it to what many would consider greener pastures. He was a man of his word throughout his life. He gave his word that he not leave Buffalo in his lifetime and he kept that word. That alone was probably enough for induction into the Hall of Fame.

"During my time as general manager, we received a very lucrative offer for the rights to Jim Kelly when he was still property of the USFL," Polian said. "I took it to Mr. Wilson and spelled it out. He kind of
looked at me with a little glint in his eye, but one of firm resolve, and said, 'We're going to sign Jim Kelly.' I said, 'This is going to be probably be the richest contract in football history. He said, 'Sign him.' That tells you how he felt about Buffalo and the Bills."

Ralph Wilson, a fan at heart

By Jerry Sullivan

Like a lot of Bills fans, I had mixed feelings about Bills owner Ralph Wilson, who died on Tuesday at age 95. It was difficult to reconcile the Hall of Fame owner, the visionary who gave Buffalo so many sporting thrills and was a driving force in the NFL merger, with the man whose small-minded decisions often contributed to management dysfunction and a losing product on the field.

More than anything, I wished I had covered Wilson in the early days of the franchise, when he was young and vibrant and full of ideas. I envied the late Larry Felser, who covered the Bills from the start. Larry knew Wilson more than half a century ago, when the AFL was in its infancy and pro football was just beginning to take a hold on the American public.

Kevin Grevey loves the Bills

One of the biggest Bills fan in First Niagara Center this week has been doing the color commentary for the Westwood One radio network. Kevin Grevey, who played in the NBA for the Washington Bullets, has a good reason to root for the Bills: It's good for business.

You see, Grevey owns the top Bills bar in the Washington, D.C. area. "Grevey's Restaurant and Sports Bar," which is located in the northern Virginia suburb of Fairfax, has been a meeting spot for transplanted Bills fans on NFL Sundays for about a quarter of a century.

Grevey said he got the idea to feature the Bills from his restaurant manager, Roger Clark, a native of Dunkirk.

"I opened my restaurant in '87 and was trying to become a sports bar," Grevey said Saturday before the start of the Syracuse-Dayton game. "There weren't a lot of sports bars back then. We had a big dish satellite. Our first go was the Cincinnati Bengals and it flopped. Then Roger said, 'All right, it's my turn. I'm going to do the Bills.'

"He said 'I can get 50 peeople here from upstate New York, no problem. We'll do beef on wecks, bring in Buffalo lager and the Sunday morning newspaper'. And we did. We made people feel like they were in Buffalo those four hours watching the game. And it caught fire.

"The Bills went to four Super Bowls in a row and we became known as a Bills bar in our area," Grevey said. "That was the first recognition I got in the restaurant business."

Grevey, who was in the legendary Adolph Rupp's last freshman class at Kentucky, played 10 years in the NBA for the Bullets and Bucks. He was a starting guard on the Bullets' 1978 NBA championship team. Veteran Buffalo hoop fans will remember him playing against the Braves back in the old Aud. He does, too.

"It was a wonderful rivalry," he said. "I remember Elvin Hayes and Bob McAdoo fighting it out for the scoring championship. I remember Cotton Fitzsimmons when I was a rookie, he took us out
to dinner in town. We had good times here in Buffalo.  It was a lot of fun, it really was."

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